Open Boxes: A Book Review

Motherhood is tough. Motherhood during the age of Facebook, Instagram, and social media in general is FRIGGIN’ HARD. As a mother, it’s not easy giving yourself grace, or remembering that other people, no matter what their status updates read or their perfectly filtered pictures show, are just like you and have difficult days, too.

Christine Organ has written a book that, through anecdotes and essays of Grace, Wonder, and Everyday Miracles, sets out to remind the reader that the inspiration we crave, the encouragement we need, is everywhere.

“Reminiscent of Anne Lamott’s artful sharing of random moments from her life experiences, Christine Organ in Open Boxes, does Lamott one step better. Organ suggests universally relevant meanings behind these outwardly ordinary, yet spirit-filled happenings. Gifted in the use of delightful analogies, Organ transforms even the messiest moments of everyday life into windows opening outward toward grace, wonder and miracles”
— Margaret Placentra Johnston, award winning author of Faith Beyond Belief: Stories of Good People Who Left Their Church Behind

A celebration of the human spirit, Open Boxes is a collection of stories that doesn’t just tell readers – but shows readers – how to live fully and connect deeply by reveling in the sacred within our everyday lives. Through stories about everything from spirituality and parenting, self-acceptance and friendship, shopping at Old Navy and bowling with preschoolers, readers will be inspired to gently lift the lids off of their compartmentalized lives and tie together the torn and tattered pieces that lie inside in order to live more fully and connect more deeply with the people and world around them. Open Boxes is filled with stories of comfort, struggle, heartache, joy, insight, compassion, resilience, and redemption. Like a cup of coffee with a good friend, the stories will soothe and inspire, uplift and motivate, entertain and encourage.

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The book is currently available for purchase on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

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